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Exact Match Study Wins Herriot Award

1 October 2013 74 views No Comment

The 2013 recipient of the Roger Herriot Award is the 1973 Current Population Survey (CPS)-Internal Revenue Service (IRS)-Social Security Administration (SSA) Exact Match Study. The study was a joint undertaking by the SSA and U.S. Census Bureau that linked survey records for persons in the March 1973 CPS to their respective earnings and benefit information in SSA administrative records and to selected items from their 1972 IRS individual income tax returns. The following were key contributors to this effort:

  • SSA: Bertram Kestenbaum, Fritz Scheuren, Wendy Alvey, Beth Kilss, Faye Miner Aziz, Ben Bridges, Linda Del Bene, Harriet Duleep, Henry Ezell, Tom Jabine, Andy Novotny, H. Lock Oh, Creston Smith, Barbara Tyler, Denny Vaughan, Linda Vogel
  • IRS: Peter Sailer, Mike Strudler, Mike Webber
  • U.S. Census Bureau: John Coder, Doug Sater, Matt Jaro, Dick Irwin, Jerry Gates, Chuck Nelson, Ed Welniak, Bill Winkler
  • Other Federal/Non-Federal: Joan Turek, Terry Ireland, Eleanor Singer, Don Rubin, John Leyes, Martha Smith Fair
  • Deceased: Joe Steinberg, Roger Herriot, Jack Carroll, Warren Buckler, Wray Smith, Emmett Spiers, Richard Wehrly, Mollie Orshansky, Dan Radner, Joe Knott, Maria Elena Gonzalez, Dorothy Projector

Roger Herriot was the Associate Commissioner of Statistical Standards and Methodology at the U.S. National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) when he died in 1994. Prior to his service at NCES, he held several positions at the U.S. Census Bureau, including chief of the Population Division. Soon after his death, the Social Statistics and Government Statistics sections of the American Statistical Association, along with the Washington Statistical Society, established the Roger Herriot Award for Innovation in Federal Statistics. The award is intended to recognize individuals or teams who, like Herriot, develop unique and innovative approaches to the solution of statistical problems in federal data-collection programs.

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