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2018 ASA Board of Directors Candidates

1 March 2017 560 views No Comment

The ASA announces the selection of candidates for the 2017 election. The winning candidates’ terms will begin in 2018. Make sure to look for your ballots in your email inbox and vote early. Voting begins at 12:01 ET March 15 and ends at 11:59 p.m. PT on May 1. Statements for candidates can be read on the ASA website.


Running for President-Elect

    David L. Banks

    Professor of the Practice, Department of Statistical Science, Duke University

    I have been fortunate to have had a checkered career. It has exposed me to a wide range of statistical activity, mostly at universities and federal agencies. But my first job out of college was doing statistical analyses for a government contractor, which is how I learned what I wanted to be.

    David L. Banks

    From graduate school forward, the ASA has been a presence in my professional life. I joined in 1980, attended my first Joint Statistical Meetings in 1982, and am happy to have been at every JSM since Philadelphia in 1984. The ASA is my community, and the friendships I have found within it have enriched my life.
    The American Statistical Association is 177 years old. It is a social machine built by generations of statisticians to achieve two purposes: to advance our profession and to advance our careers. In terms of the first goal, the ASA has had many successes—it has distinguished statisticians from mathematicians, enabled and empowered the federal statistical agencies, and brought statistical thinking into the high-school curriculum.

    But challenges change. I believe the hurdles ahead are to ensure that public policy is based upon data, rather than politics, that we strategically redefine our relationship with the emerging data science community, and that we help the general citizenship to see us as somewhat cooler and a bit more trustworthy then they presently do.

    In terms of the second goal, the ASA has been strikingly successful in fostering careers. Compared to many other fields, we are, on median, well compensated and enjoy high levels of job satisfaction. But we need to do more to raise the floor. And, since careers at different stages use the ASA’s assets in different ways, we need to clue in junior colleagues on how the ASA can help leverage professional growth.

    One of the joys of our profession is that, compared to other sciences, we are relatively diverse in gender and employment (besides academics and industry, we are prominent in government). We must work to build that out more. If elected as ASA president, I would use the office to further our field and to help others advance.

    Statistics has pivoted from mathematics toward applications (we are a big tent, and there will always be need for deep theory, but our world is bigger than that). We must provide capacity to support that change. For example, I believe MS and PhD students (and everyone else) should have easier opportunities to learn the modern heavy-lifting Big Data programming languages, such as Spark. The ASA can help that happen. Also, I believe that our publication system no longer efficiently serves our science—I have an extended rant on this that appeared in Amstat News #424—and I shall urge the ASA to modernize.

    Those who know me know that I would be an active president. The office is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to work with some of the best people on the planet to make our profession stronger. I could never waste that “chance.”


    Karen Kafadar

    Chair and Commonwealth Professor, Department of Statistics, University of Virginia

    “… [A]s new discoveries are made, new truths discovered, and manners and opinions change, with the change of circumstances, institutions must advance also to keep pace with the times.” ~ Thomas Jefferson

    Karen Kafadar

    I am pleased to run for ASA president at a time when our strategic plan goals—enhancing diversity and breadth of our association, increasing visibility of our profession, and ensuring our future—are as urgent as they have ever been. But the “circumstances” that drive our goals have changed: We face complex challenges and we “must advance also to keep pace with the times.”

    Challenges

    Our profession faces threats in many fields (data science, psychology, economics, bioinformatics) whose training may include casual brushes with statistics. This has created populations of self-proclaimed statisticians who can sideline us in critical research areas unless we actively change our approach to statistical education and our response to society’s needs to be more relevant to today’s demand for solutions to complex multifaceted problems.
    Complex problems—such as detecting emerging epidemics, ensuring food safety, protecting our communications, and establishing reliable standards—cannot be solved by single individuals. More urgently, we need to anticipate these needs before others capitalize on our delay and develop attractive, but flawed, approaches. These challenges require diverse talents that include domain scientists and the best statistical solutions from statisticians whom we attract to our field and prepare to face big problems.

    The ASA must create ways to forecast these tsunamis of change, identify our present and future statisticians to address them, and assist our members in developing data-based solutions that require our statistical expertise.

    Teams for Complex Problems

    These challenges present opportunities to promote our profession and to grow our field, both in numbers of statisticians and in the nature and quality of research solutions that define us. In my experience, statisticians have been critical components of teams that address problems in academe, industry (HP), and government (NIST, NCI). All too often, this involvement arises by serendipity. Two examples are the 2009 NAS [National Academies of Science] report on forensic science and the IPCC [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] climate change reports; on both, the ASA reinforced statisticians’ roles by keeping the topics on congressional and media radar screens. We need to develop further mechanisms to both forecast areas of change and respond to them while we continue to build on our past successes.

    Engaging Our Sections and Chapters

    We can start by mobilizing the talent in our sections and chapters. In education, many ASA chapters have active connections with their local schools and universities. Our future ASA members will come from diverse populations only if they can identify with those they see today. The [ASA] Board and I can work with ASA chapters to support good role models on their outreach visits to local colleges, elementary [schools], and high schools. Next, experts in sections’ disciplines such as the sciences, health care, and computing can easily identify critical problems within their domains. The ASA can mobilize teams to match these problems with scientific and statistical expertise and initiate mechanisms to tackle them.

    The Next Statistical Frontiers

    The age of self-contained problems solved by analyzing a few data sets is rapidly being replaced by global challenges that span multiple disciplines whose diverse data demand a myriad of methodological approaches. We must design mechanisms so our engagement on important complex problems is more likely and timely than mere serendipity, and then deliver results. I am honored by the opportunity to serve the ASA as president, and will work with the diversity of expertise and talent in our association to develop ways to better enable us to identify, mobilize, support, and encourage our members to work on important problems and, in so doing, learn from all of you as well.


      Running for Vice President

        Lorraine Denby

        Principal, Murray Hill Data Science

        My history within the ASA has been that, when elected to an office, I have created initiatives that make a lasting mark on our profession, raised the funds as needed, and carried them out to fruition. Some of these initiatives are still in place today. I would be grateful to have this opportunity again as your vice president.

        Lorraine Denby

        For example, you may not know the history of Amstat.org. As representative to the Council of Sections in the mid-90s, I decided that it was time for the ASA to have a web presence. I approached the board and got its approval, but no financial assistance. I then approached each section for a donation toward the project, raised over $30k, formed the committee, and voila! Amstat.org was born. By the way, our first URL choice (asa.org) was already taken. Many kudos to my great committee as I did not have the talents to do this on my own. Our design and initial server stayed in place for many years.

        As chair of the Graphics Section, I initiated the student poster competition where elementary and high-school students pose a question of interest, collect and analyze the related data, and display the results in a poster. I got the idea by attending an ISI conference in Tokyo. Such a contest was in place in Japan, where over 10k students submitted entries. The winning posters were displayed at JSM. I arranged an opening reception and invited the ambassador from Japan to attend. We were honored by the vice ambassador. The most recent poster winners were featured in August 2016 Amstat News.

        The first ASA Data Expo presented a data set for members to analyze and display their results in a poster session at JSM. It was an artificial data set that, when projected the right way, displayed the word eureka. I decided that it would be a more meaningful exercise if we used real data. Thus, for the next several years, I chaired the Data Expo and obtained real data to be analyzed: crab fishery data from Alaska Fish and Wildlife, places rated data from the Places Rated Almanac, and baseball salary data. I even arranged for crab legs to be donated from Alaska and put on a crab dinner for those who participated. The Data Expo continued for 30 years, until 2013, and featured the analysis of real data.

        But, these are examples from the past. What would I like to do in the future?

        Increase public and business awareness of statistics. Anyone who has a computer with some number crunching software feels that he/she can analyze data properly. My daughter worked at a business intelligence company. When she tried to convince them to hire someone with training in statistics, they felt there was no need for that since she could fill that bill with her two statistics courses in college. Yet, their business was based on the analysis of Big Data sets and advising clients about important business decisions based on this analysis. This situation is all too common. We need to develop a program to educate businesses about the need for trained statisticians and the benefits they could reap by hiring them.

        Sustainability of our society. Of the 7,000 JSM participants last year, about 1,500 were students. But, do the students continue to join the ASA upon reaching the business world? For the most part, not a large enough percentage does. We need to develop programs that will interest students in continuing their membership and becoming active members of our society. We can run focus groups for students at JSM. Doing so will give us ideas to implement so the ASA will better meet their needs. I will also work with our chapters to encourage and support them in sponsoring local meetups, targeting JSM first-timers or potential members.

        Webinars are a popular vehicle these days for conducting meetings and training. We could add more of them to our offerings. Be assured that, if elected, I will initiate one or more programs that will have lasting value to our society and profession. I hope you will provide me that opportunity.


        Katherine Monti

        Retired from Rho, Inc.

        I am indeed honored to be considered to be a vice president of the ASA. The field of statistics has come a long way since I joined the ASA in 1975 (two years before John Tukey formally introduced box and whisker plots in his Exploratory Data Analysis). The association has come a long way, too. Neither statistics nor the ASA will stop changing, and that’s a good thing.

        Katherine Monti

        The ASA is always changing as the membership grows. But the association not only needs new statisticians, the world needs more statisticians. Encouraging students to become statisticians has been a continuing goal for many of us. To this end, I have enjoyed giving talks at career nights, hosting career-oriented roundtables, and contributing to the Amstat News career-oriented series (A Day in the Life of a Statistician and STATtr@k).

        The Biopharmaceutical Section’s pharmaceutical statisticians video has demonstrated that outreach efforts really work to attract young folks to the field. Reaching out works! But we have to keep finding new and engaging ways to encourage students to play in all corners of our diverse professional sandbox, or to at least let them know about statistics, because even those who choose other careers need to know at least some statistics!

        Encouraging the appropriate application of statistics is another crucial challenge. I have seen a legal case partially derailed by a PhD nonstatistician with his own way of thinking about data, an MD nonstatistician achieve significance in a clinical trial by treating the three-month data and the six-month data on the same patients as independent results, and, well, we all have our horror stories. Even daily news reports can give us pause: Did that study in the headlines control for the covariates that bias the results if not taken into account? All too frequently, the answer is no.

        As our Big Tent for Statistics grows even wider, we need to work on “Big Education” and “Big Communication” regarding the principles of design, the methods of analysis, and the ethical and valid interpretation of results. What types of programs increase our numbers and expand the appropriate use of statistics in applications?

        Many academic programs now incorporate supervised consulting experience into interdisciplinary consulting labs, some of which contribute to training of statisticians in developing countries. The ASA has backed pro bono efforts such as the student-run StatCom (Statistics in the Community) and the outreach group Statistics without Borders. The newly instituted ThisIsStatistics campaign uses social media to encourage the exploration of statistics, and expanding the use of podcasts is one of the strategic initiatives of 2017 ASA President Barry Nussbaum. All of these efforts demonstrate our commitment to encouraging interest in the field and in the sound use of statistics. Tweets, podcasts, Facebook, Pinterest, K–12 online resources—the association is evolving with the times and will necessarily continue to do so. The ASA has a lot to tackle as it continues to evolve, so a broad perspective is valuable.

        The job portion of my (very rewarding) career has taken me from academia to non-pharma industry to devices to pharmaceuticals (at a sponsor and then at a CRO), with some additional consulting along the way. The equally rewarding service portion of my career includes diverse leadership roles in ASA chapters, committees, sections, and the board. If elected, I look forward to bringing all these perspectives to serve the ASA as it moves forward. Member input is always highly valued, so please share your ideas with any of those serving on the ASA Board. Remember: Voting in the ASA election is an important form of input!


          Running for COSGB Representative to the Board

            John L. Czajka

            Senior Fellow, Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.

            I would be honored to serve as one of the Council of Section’s representatives to the board of directors. As a recent chair of the Council of Sections, an earlier vice chair, and a former officer in three sections, I believe that I am well prepared to represent the sections on the ASA Board of Directors.

            John L. Czajka

            Under the first of three themes, “Fulfilling Our Role as ‘The Big Tent for Statistics,’” the ASA’s Strategic Plan observes that a strength of the association is its mix of members from education, business and industry, and government. Students have provided the largest source of growth in ASA membership for a number of years, but retention of student members once they complete their degrees has been low. Retaining members who leave academia may pose the greatest challenge, but is critical to maintaining the diversity of our membership and achieving other goals of the association. One of my priorities as a member of the board of directors would be to expand the ASA’s efforts to retain those former student members who have begun careers in business and industry and government. This must go hand-in-hand with continuing to support our strong academic membership.

            Under the second theme of “Increasing the Visibility of the Profession,” I strongly support the ASA’s efforts to “promote the value of sound statistical practice” in policymaking. The importance of increasing the visibility of our association and profession will undoubtedly grow in the next few years. I commend the ASA for its initiatives in this area, which include the preparation of white papers, advocacy in support of the federal statistical system and major research budgets, the release of policy statements, and the development of resources for policymakers. As a participant in the public policy arena professionally, I would work as a board member to enhance these activities.

            As one who has been active in sections from early on, I am puzzled that fewer than half of the ASA’s members belong to sections. We need to understand why this is so and whether greater participation in sections is a goal that the ASA should pursue. For starters, I would work with the ASA to determine how we could enhance our membership data to enable us to better address fundamental questions about participation in sections. For example, how many of those who do not belong to sections once did so—and for how long? More effectively serving our membership may very well involve an expanded role for the sections.

            The ASA has been a keystone of my professional life for more than 30 years. I would welcome the opportunity to share my extensive experience by serving on the association’s board of directors.


            Katherine Halvorsen

            Professor of Mathematics and Statistics, Smith College

            My primary concern for our profession is that we continue to promote awareness of the essential importance of statistics in natural and social science research, as well as in the public sphere, including government, industry, and education. The ASA’s strategic plan addresses my concern through its emphasis on membership growth in both numbers and diversity and on education from kindergarten through 12th grade, through post-graduate continuing education, and through outreach to special groups such as journalists and Capitol Hill staff. I strongly support the ASA’s work on the undergraduate curriculum, the statistical education of teachers, and outreach to K–12 teachers through Meeting Within a Meeting.

            Katherine Halvorsen

            Having served as chair of the Council of Sections, I have worked with groups applying to become new sections, as well as with the established sections, all of whom are concerned about having opportunities for their members to present invited sessions, panels, posters, and short courses at JSM. The proliferation of new sections fits neatly into the ASA’s goal of being “The Big Tent for Statistics,” encouraging a broadening and diversification of membership, but becomes unwieldy when we have to find opportunities for these groups to present at JSM. We need to find additional opportunities for members to present their work and network with others who share their interests. This might come through new specialized conferences (such as the Conference on Statistical Practice or Women in Statistics and Data Science), journals, webinars, or even newsletters. I would like to work with the board of directors to address these issues.

            I would be honored to serve as one of the Council of Section’s representatives to the ASA Board of Directors. I have been a member of the association since the 1980s and have served as chair and vice-chair of both the Council of Sections and the Advisory Committee on Continuing Education. I currently serve on the Leadership Support Council.


              Running for COCGB Representative to the Board

                Donsig Jang

                Vice President and Director, Center for Excellence in Survey Research, NORC at the University of Chicago

                If elected to serve as a Council of Chapters representative to the board, I will work with other board members to support ASA to have a strategic plan (Enhancing the Diversity and Breadth of Our Association) well implemented. I strongly believe that this data-driven world brings us statisticians an exciting opportunity to bring our value to help improve every part of our lives. But it won’t happen without efforts.

                Donsig Jang

                As an applied statistician working in an environment with subject-matter researchers who are often highly quantitative, I strongly feel that real value statisticians should be able to bring to is not just statistical method, but statistical lens to solve problems. It requires understanding of fields we are working on, communications skills to converse with clients and collaborators in the field, and proactive leaderships to work together with team members.

                I often made a joke that statistical value for a given project is not defined by a statistician, but by a project director or subject-matter expert. It’s largely true to many statisticians almost everywhere. I hope that the ASA provides necessary supports to members to help them have a right mindset as a statistician.

                Another area I would like to work with other board members in is to help broaden statistics to embrace machine learning and other computation disciplines. In this Big Data era, it is our obligation to have statistical principles continue to be relevant in extracting right information from messy data. It needs an effort to have statistical methods bridged with computer science perspectives. I hope that the ASA will become a professional home for data scientists in coming years.

                Last, ASA members have become diversified in many different ways in recent years. But there are many professionals who were trained in statistics or similar quantitative disciplines, but are not ASA members. I will work with the ASA Board to have ASA outreach to them, particularly those who are in nonacademic fields.

                In closing, it is an honor and privilege to get nominated as a candidate for COCGB. I will continue to support ASA strategic plan and serve for whatever capacity I am allowed, regardless of this election outcome.


                Alexander Cambon

                Mathematical Statistician, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

                “A strength of the ASA is the mix of members from business/industry, government, and education …” (From Theme 1, ASA Strategic Plan). It has been my good fortune to work in all three of these categories due to my involvement in the ASA.

                Alexander Cambon

                In 1996, when I joined the ASA, I was a statistician teaching and implementing statistical process control, experiment design, and reliability testing in an industrial/manufacturing setting. ASA meetings and JSM increased my awareness of the growing field of biostatistics and clinical trials. I eventually became a biostatistician at the University of Louisville (U of L) Statistical Consulting Center. My connections in the ASA Kentucky Chapter played a vital role in facilitating this career opportunity. I went to meetings because I enjoyed the talks, and I enjoyed getting to know statisticians and their different areas of work. This type of informal setting can be an important part of networking and career building.

                Many of us can probably think of ways ASA involvement has influenced/enhanced our careers. The membership fee is definitely a high-return investment. In telling our stories, let’s get the word out to “make the value of long-term membership evident to all groups that are well represented or ought to be well represented among ASA membership.” Strategies in the plan include expanding “our market research capabilities to provide more and better data about the needs and interests of members and potential members.”

                Diversity has been a key part of my life. My father was an immigrant from Italy, where I lived when I was very young. After college, I served as a water resource and health development engineer in a small village in Burkina Faso, West Africa, for 2.5 years. Later, work took me overseas to teach short courses in reliability engineering. I then went to a Chinese school in Louisville to attain an intermediate speaking level in Chinese. The University of Louisville was a very diverse environment and I had many opportunities to practice Chinese on the bus or at work.

                As part of my role as a biostatistician at U of L, I often organized local ASA chapter meetings, scheduled speakers, and attended JSM to present topics and attend ASA meetings as a chapter representative. In 2010, with help from members of the Cincinnati and Kentucky chapters, I organized a joint traveling course for the Kentucky and Cincinnati chapters. Joint meetings such as this were very popular and provided additional opportunities to connect. Afterward, I served as District 2 vice chair, Council of Chapters Governing Board. In this capacity, I endeavored to help the chapters that were more isolated by utilizing resources from ASA headquarters, as well as resources from/connections with other chapters.

                The strength of local chapters and JSM also enhances the ASA’s ability to invest in and support another theme in the strategic plan: “Increasing the Visibility of Our Profession.” In today’s climate more than ever, our profession has vital input into increasingly complex areas of data science and analytics. Tools such as Stats.org and ThisIsStatistics.org are two of many ways the ASA is using to elevate public awareness.

                I am honored to be a candidate for the COCGB representative to the ASA Board of Directors. If elected, I will be an advocate for local chapters through my membership in the Council of Chapters and the COCGB. I will work to see that appropriate parts of the strategic plan (examples are highlighted above) are implemented to “make the value of long-term membership evident to all groups that are well represented or ought to be well represented among ASA membership.”


                  Running for Publications Representative to the Board

                    Scott Evans

                    Senior Research Scientist, Center for Biostatistics in AIDS Research/Department of Biostatistics, Harvard University

                    It is an exciting and important time for statistics and the ASA. Rapidly evolving access to data and advances in science and technologies create many challenges. But these challenges are also unprecedented opportunities to advance science, education, and policy through discoveries that can change the world to better serve society.

                    Scott Evans

                    Statistics is a common denominator for much of science. We must strengthen our relationships and communications with data experts in other disciplines and the broader scientific community, media, and public. We must evolve with the data science and Big Data revolutions, promoting statistics at the core of these progressions.

                    The need for statistical expertise and leadership has never been greater. The ASA plays an indispensable leadership role as the preeminent professional association for statistics. The ASA’s Strategic Plan outlines three foundational themes. The first is enhancing ASA diversity and strength through membership, professional development, and publications. The ASA has more than 19,000 members with increasing student and senior memberships. Effort is needed to attract regular members.

                    ASA publications have prestigious worldwide reputations and are a major asset to the profession and the ASA. But publications face modern challenges: transition to electronic/open access introducing financial viability issues with reduced individual subscriptions; an irreproducibility pandemic where statistics is often the scapegoat; journal proliferation threatening quality and citation rates; and slow review processes. The ASA must proactively address these issues. It is a time of great change and promise for publications. The ASA can modernize processes to maintain publication quality, utility, and relevancy with continued transitioning to electronic/open distribution while responsibly addressing the implications. New publication/peer-review models (e.g., living/collaborative documents) that exploit technology to increase access and improve functionality (e.g., rapid reviews) are emerging and can be evaluated. The ASA and social media can engage members in the process. The ASA must seek balance, providing a vibrant journal portfolio that serves the diverse needs of ASA members while protecting against journal proliferation to ensure quality and impact. ASA publications also have the opportunity and responsibility to provide leadership and infrastructure for scientific issue positioning (e.g., ASA’s statement on statistical significance and p-values).

                    A second theme is ensuring the future of our profession through education, leadership development, and sound fiscal strategy. It is critical that the ASA help lead the transformation of statistics education and teaching in the K–12 and college levels to improve the statistical literacy of society. We must also improve training of our future generations of statisticians, focusing not only on fundamentals, but also on leadership, supporting intangible skills, and creative thinking (i.e., thinking first and then researching and executing). Learning statistics is one thing, but learning to be a statistician is another.

                    The final theme is increasing the visibility and appreciation of our profession through public awareness, impact on policy, and contributions to interdisciplinary collaborations. The statistical ambassadors program that trains statisticians to communicate with the media plays a crucial role. Expanding our role and impact in science policy is paramount. The ASA now provides leadership and an infrastructure for impacting areas such as climate change and forensics. While interaction with other disciplines is natural for statisticians, we must better communicate with collaborators, engaging as thought leaders in addition to technical roles. The perception of statisticians as calculators, service providers, and data warehouses must evolve to innovative strategists and problem solvers that turn information into knowledge to improve decision making.


                    Richard Levine

                    Professor of Statistics, San Diego State University Department of Mathematics and Statistics

                    Over the past 20 years, we have been confronted by a seemingly continuous attempt to rebrand our profession. The buzzwords of metrics (e.g., biometrics, chemometrics, and environmetrics), data mining, informatics, analytics, and now data science hit the scientific community, if not mainstream media, as we grapple with the deluge and complexity of data generated in this information age. The ASA leadership and board of directors have positioned our profession to be at the center of this movement. Recent developments that exemplify these directions include the ThisIsStatistics public relations campaign, data science–oriented curricula guidelines in K–12 and undergraduate statistics programs, PStat and GStat accreditations, and the p-value statement on good statistical practice. The board, and particularly new directors, must stay on top of, and more importantly ahead of, these data science trends.

                    Richard Levine

                    At the heart of the data science evolution are digital technologies that have and will provide awesome new opportunities for ASA publications. These challenges present themselves through dynamic scholarly communication systems: peer review models with quicker turnarounds; open access portals with article/blog feedback and review mechanisms; and reproducible research via seamless dissemination of data, code, and methods. The board will be challenged to meet the diverse statistical needs of our readership and the public broadly while maintaining our reputation for scientific excellence and publications of the highest quality.

                    I would be honored and excited to continue my service to the statistics profession as a member of the ASA Board of Directors. I believe my experience and expertise ideally situates me to represent our publications on the board and collaborate with our membership to shape our initiatives and place statistics as the leader of the data science crusade.


                      ASA Election Candidates List

                        COCGB (Council of Chapters Governing Board)

                        Chair-Elect
                        Isaac Nuamah
                        Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical R&D
                        Andrew Reilly
                        Retired

                        Vice-Chair, Region 1, District 1
                        Lynn Sleeper
                        Boston Children Hospital and Harvard Medical School
                        Ofer Harel
                        University of Connecticut

                        Vice-Chair, Region 1, District 2
                        Chandan Saha
                        Indiana University School of Medicine
                        David Fardo
                        University of Kentucky College of Public Health

                        COSGB (Council of Sections Governing Board)

                        Chair-Elect
                        Natalie Rotelli
                        Eli Lilly and Company
                        Marlene Egger
                        University of Utah Department of Family and Preventive Medicine

                        Vice-Chair
                        Stephine Keeton
                        Pharmaceutical Product Development, Inc.
                        Philip Scinto
                        The Lubrizol Corporation

                        Bayesian Statistical Sciences Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Steven MacEachern
                        The Ohio State University
                        Susan Paddock
                        RAND Corporation

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Robert B. Gramacy
                        Virginia Tech
                        Christopher Hans
                        The Ohio State University

                        Publication Officer
                        Anirban Battacharya
                        Texas A&M University
                        Xinyi Xu
                        The Ohio State University

                        Biometrics Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Sheng Luo
                        The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
                        Candidate withdrew

                        Council of Sections Representative
                        Dipankar Bandyopadhyay
                        Virginia Commonwealth University
                        Jay Bartroff
                        University of Southern California

                        Biopharmaceutical Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Xiaohui (Ed) Luo
                        PTC Therapeutics
                        Richard C. Zink
                        SAS Institute

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Margaret Gamalo-Siebers
                        Eli Lilly and Company
                        Judy Li
                        U.S. Food and Drug Administration

                        Secretary
                        Ugochi Emeribe
                        AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals
                        Janelle K. Charles
                        U.S. Food and Drug Administration

                        Council of Sections Representative
                        Jennifer Gauvin
                        Novartis Pharmaceutical Corporation
                        Brian Millen
                        Eli Lilly and Company

                        Business and Economic Statistics Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Peter Zadrozny
                        Bureau of Labor Statistics
                        Erika McEntarfer
                        U.S. Census Bureau

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Marina Gindelsky
                        Bureau of Economic Analysis
                        Mariana Saenz
                        Georgia Southern University

                        Government Statistics Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Michael Messner
                        Environmental Protection Agency
                        Elizabeth Mannshardt
                        U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Jeffrey Gonzalez
                        Bureau of Labor Statistics
                        Jonathan Lyle Auerbach
                        Columbia University

                        Health Policy Statistics Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Ofer Harel
                        University of Connecticut
                        Ruth Etzioni
                        Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

                        Medical Devices and Diagnostics Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Zhen Zhang
                        Abbott Vascular
                        Beimar Iriarte
                        Abbott Laboratories

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Gerry Gray
                        Data-Fi, LLC
                        Martin Ho
                        Center for Devices and Radiological Health

                        Mental Health Statistics Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Booil Jo
                        Stanford University School of Medicine
                        Satesh Iyengar
                        University of Pittsburgh

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Dulal Bhaumik
                        University of Illinois at Chicago
                        Ramzi Nahhas
                        Wright State University

                        Nonparametric Statistics Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Piotr Fryzlewicz
                        London School of Economics
                        Dimitris Politis
                        University of California, San Diego

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Richard Samworth
                        University of Cambridge
                        Bing Li
                        Penn State University

                        Treasurer
                        Limin Peng
                        Emory University
                        Yoonkyung Lee
                        The Ohio State University

                        Publications Officer
                        Naveen Naidu Narisetty
                        University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
                        Po-Ling Loh
                        University of Wisconsin at Madison

                        Quality and Productivity Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Brian P. Weaver
                        Los Alamos National Laboratory
                        Peng Liu
                        JMP Division, SAS Institute

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Abdel-Salam Gomaa
                        Qatar University
                        Shan Ba
                        Procter & Gamble

                        Physical and Engineering Sciences Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Byran J. Smucker
                        Miami University
                        Ananda Sen
                        University of Michigan

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Xinwei Deng
                        Virginia Tech
                        Brad Evans
                        Pfizer, Inc.

                        Secretary/Treasurer
                        Jennifer Kensler
                        Shell International Exploration and Production
                        Matthew T. Pratola
                        The Ohio State University

                        Risk Analysis Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Jing Zhang
                        Miami University
                        Susan Simmons
                        North Carolina State University

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Aric LaBarr
                        North Carolina State University
                        Jiwei Zhao
                        SUNY at Buffalo

                        Secretary/Treasurer
                        Piaomu Liu
                        Bentley University
                        Christopher Sroka
                        New Mexico State University

                        Publications Officer
                        Lingling An
                        The University of Arizona
                        Maria Barouti
                        American University

                        Council of Sections Representative
                        Alexandra Kapatou
                        American University
                        Edsel Pena
                        University of South Carolina

                        Social Statistics Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Tim Liao
                        University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
                        Trudi Renwick
                        U.S. Census Bureau
                        Eileen O’Brien
                        U.S. Energy Information Administration

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Stephanie Ewert
                        U.S. Census Bureau
                        Candidate withdrew

                        Secretary/Treasurer
                        Yulei He
                        National Center for Health Statistics
                        Stephanie Eckman
                        RTI International
                        Jiashen You
                        Department of Homeland Security and The George Washington University

                        Statistical Computing Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Wendy Martinez
                        Bureau of Labor Statistics
                        David Hunter
                        Penn State University

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Usha Govindarajulu
                        SUNY Downstate Medical Center
                        Sebastian Kurtek
                        The Ohio State University

                        Secretary/Treasurer
                        Matthias Katzfuss
                        Texas A&M University
                        Jared Murray
                        Carnegie Mellon University

                        Council of Sections Representative
                        David van Dyk
                        Imperial College London
                        Rajib Paul
                        Western Michigan University

                        Statistical Consulting Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Jonathan Mahnken
                        University of Kansas Medical Center
                        LeAnna Stork
                        Monsanto

                        Secretary/Treasurer
                        Mekibib Altaye
                        Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
                        Chris Barker
                        Statistical Planning and Analysis Services, Inc.

                        Council of Sections Representative
                        Hsin-Yi (Cindy) Weng
                        University of Utah
                        Hrishikesh Chakraborty
                        University of South Carolina

                        Executive Committee at Large
                        Jason Machan
                        Lifespan Hospital System
                        Wei-Ting Hwang
                        University of Pennsylvania

                        Statistical Education Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel
                        Duke University
                        Roger Woodard
                        North Carolina State University

                        Council of Sections Representative
                        Matt Hayat
                        Georgia State University
                        Adam Sullivan
                        Brown University

                        Executive Committee at Large
                        Leigh Johnson
                        Capital University
                        Sharon Lane-Getaz
                        St. Olaf College
                        Weiwen Miao
                        Haverford College
                        Cassandra Pattanayak
                        Wellesley College

                        Statistical Graphics Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Dianne Cook
                        Monash University
                        Kaiser Fung
                        Columbia University Program
                        Mahbubul Majumder
                        University of Nebraska at Omaha

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Edward Mulrow
                        NORC at the University of Chicago

                        Publications Officer
                        Joyce Robbins
                        Columbia University and NBR
                        Abbass Sharif
                        University of Southern California

                        Statistical Learning and Data Science Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Heping Zhang
                        Yale University School of Public Health
                        Tian Zheng
                        Columbia University

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Ali Shojaie
                        University of Washington
                        Vincent Vu
                        The Ohio State University

                        Statistical Programmers and Analysts Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Candidate withdrew
                        Jonathan Lisic
                        National Agricultural Statistics Service

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        William Coar
                        Axio Research
                        Richard Schwinn
                        U.S. Small Business Administration

                        Secretary
                        Marianne Miller
                        Eli Lilly and Company
                        Pratheepa Jeganathan
                        Stanford University

                        Treasurer
                        Amy Gillespie
                        Merck & Co., Inc.
                        Michael Yingling
                        Washington University School of Medicine

                        Publications Officer
                        Enayetur Raheem
                        Carolinas HealthCare System
                        Tasneem Zaihra
                        SUNY Brockport

                        Statistics and the Environment Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Christopher Wikle
                        University of Missouri – Columbia
                        Jarrett Barber
                        Northern Arizona University

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Will Kleiber
                        University of Colorado, Boulder
                        Alexandra Schmidt
                        McGill University

                        Treasurer
                        Maria Terres
                        The Climate Corporation
                        Ying Sun
                        King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

                        Publications Chair-Elect
                        Oksana Chkrebtii
                        The Ohio State University
                        K. Sham Bhat
                        Los Alamos National Laboratory

                        Council of Sections Representative
                        Jenise Swall
                        Virginia Commonwealth University
                        Wendy Meiring
                        University of California, Santa Barbara

                        Statistics in Defense and National Security Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Jane Pinelis
                        The Johns Hopkins University
                        Taps Maiti
                        Michigan State University

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Erin Hodgess
                        University of Houston
                        Kassandra Fronczyk
                        Institute for Defense Analyses

                        Statistics in Epidemiology Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Jing Cheng
                        University of California, San Francisco
                        Kathleen Jablonski
                        The George Washington University

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Yingqi Zhao
                        Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
                        Veronica Berrocal
                        University of Michigan

                        Publications Officer
                        Yan Ma
                        The George Washington University
                        Colin Fogarty
                        MIT Sloan School of Management

                        Council of Sections Representative
                        Rebecca Yates Coley
                        Group Health Research Institute
                        Nandita Mitra
                        University of Pennsylvania

                        Statistics in Genomics and Genetics Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Dan Nicolae
                        The University of Chicago
                        Dan Nettleton
                        Iowa State University

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Hongkai Ji
                        The Johns Hopkins University
                        Li-Xuan Qin
                        Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

                        Council of Sections Representative
                        Pei Wang
                        Mount Sinai School of Medicine
                        Peng Wei
                        MD Anderson Cancer Center

                        Statistics in Imaging Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Xi Luo
                        Brown University
                        Bin Nan
                        University of Michigan
                        Hernando Ombao
                        University of California at Irvine

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Nicole Carlson
                        University of Colorado
                        Linglong Kong
                        University of Alberta
                        Ting-Ting Zhang
                        University of Virginia

                        Council of Sections Representative
                        Amanda Mejia
                        Indiana University
                        Dana Tudorascu
                        University of Pittsburgh

                        Statistics in Marketing Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Lynd Bacon
                        Loma Buena Associates, Northwestern University, Notre Dame University
                        Victoria Gamerman
                        Boehringer-Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Tim Trudell
                        Nielsen
                        Sarjinder Singh
                        Texas A&M University-Kingsville

                        Treasurer
                        Hiya Banerjee
                        Novartis Pharmaceuticals Inc.
                        Lihang Yin
                        Leaders Financial & Insurance Services, Inc.

                        Statistics in Sports Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Luke Bornn
                        Simon Fraser University
                        Shane Reese
                        Brigham Young University

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Sam Ventura
                        Carnegie Mellon University
                        Andrew Swift
                        University of Nebraska at Omaha

                        Council of Sections Representative
                        Stephanie Kovalchik
                        Tennis Australia/Victoria University
                        Kenny Shirley
                        Amazon

                        Survey Research Methods Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Kennon Copeland
                        NORC at the University of Chicago
                        Mansour Fahimi
                        GfK Custom Research

                        Program Chair-Elect
                        Asaph Young Chun
                        U.S. Census Bureau
                        Michael Sinclair
                        Mathematica Policy Research

                        Secretary
                        Safaa Amer
                        RTI International
                        Bo Lu
                        The Ohio State University

                        Council of Sections Representative
                        Jamie Ridenhour
                        RTI International
                        Michael Yang
                        NORC at the University of Chicago

                        Teaching Statistics in the Health Sciences Section

                        Chair-Elect
                        Amy Nowacki
                        Cleveland Clinic
                        John McGready
                        Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

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