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Experts Ready for You to Ask Them Anything

1 March 2017 12 views No Comment
Lara Harmon

    The first Ask Me Anything (AMA) took place in September with ASA Science Policy Fellow Amy Nussbaum. It was so overwhelmingly popular that the ASA lined up a few more. In case you missed it, an AMA is a written online interview in which a subject-matter expert volunteers to answer questions submitted in real time by the members of a discussion group. ASA student and early-career members can ask professionals vital questions about making the transition from student to working life, building experience, assuming leadership, and more. Here’s what’s coming up over on the ASA Community:

    March 20: Kimberly Sellers

    Chair, Committee on Women in Statistics

    Sellers

    Kimberly Sellers is an associate professor of mathematics and statistics, specializing in statistics. She has held faculty positions at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine as an assistant professor of biostatistics and senior scholar at the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics. Her areas of interest and expertise are in generalized statistical methods involving count data that contain data dispersion and in image analysis techniques, particularly low-level analyses including preprocessing, normalization, feature detection, and alignment. 

    April 25: Chris Franklin

    ASA K–12 Statistical Ambassador

    Franklin

    Chris Franklin is a recognized leader in K–12 statistics education. She is the lead author of the GAISE Pre-K–12 and SET reports, a proponent of the inclusion of increased statistics content in the Georgia K–12 standards, a recent Fulbright Scholar focusing on statistics education in New Zealand, an ASA Founders Award recipient, a former AP Statistics chief reader, and the current chair of the ASA/NCTM Joint Committee on Curriculum in Statistics and Probability. She also has authored or co-authored two textbooks and numerous articles and book chapters related to K–16 statistics education.

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